Your Wireless Headphones Could Be Spying on You

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QuietComfort 35
Credit: amazon.in
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We all need to catch a break from daily issues about security and privacy concerns when it comes to the use of gadgets and the Internet but it is not going to happen anytime soon.

Today, the culprit is a device you probably never expected to pry into your private life – headphones.

One Kyle Zak has filed a complaint against Bose seeking an injunction to halt Bose Corp from violating privacy concerns. The named user was prompted to download the Bose Connect app (available for both Android and iOS) after purchasing the popular QC 35 Wireless headphones in order ‘get the most out of his headphones.’ Particularly, the app prompts the user to input their personal details including emails and the serial number of their headsets.

Surprisingly, Bose accumulates all media information from the gadget in question and passes it to third parties. Such information is then tailored and sold for business purposes. This is worrying owing to the private nature of the kind of music a person likes and the podcasts they listen to. Worse, the headphone’s giant app does not explain the clause of sharing user data in their privacy agreement, which contradicts what a good-meaning app does before opting in for such extended services.

Bose is a successful company and their flagship headphones, the QuiteComfort 35 do not come cheap at $350. The corporation’s annual sale is valued at around $3.5 billion and we will how this suit plays out in the end. Also, it joins the likes of LG that has been sued but for different reasons altogether.

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