2015 HDTV Buying Guide For Giftgivers


Televisions have always been considered a powerful gifts and they have come a long way since the days of black-and-white boxes with side-speakers and protruding adjustable knobs. Back then, everyone thought they knew the perfect way to bend the antenna (in order to capture the right picture quality). It was a generic time, and televisions were mass produced. The televisions of old didn’t differ from one to the other (until color became an option), like they do today.

These days, things aren’t so cut and dry. Many households struggle to determine which television model is right for their home-which can sometimes make it even more difficult to know what kind of TV to gift someone else.

In the paragraphs below you’ll learn some basics about television buying, so you can make an informed decision for your next gift or household.

There’s a lot to consider, including:

·  3D technology

·  4K technology

·  Plasma, LED TVs or LCD TVs

·  Screen size

·  And, programming

3D and 4K Technology

3D and 4K are two very different things. 3D televisions present three-dimensional images when the viewer is wearing special glasses. You don’t need glasses to view the incredible clear images 4K televisions produce.  4K is called such because it produces four times the number of pixels a normal HDTV produces. Thus, it is the absolute best picture a television buyer can hope to have, and for that reason it’s also the most expensive.

Plasma TVs

Plasma TVs offer a great viewing angle, but they aren’t as popular as their contemporaries. Electronics reviewer CNET chalks plasma’s unpopularity up to size and availability.

“When electronics companies started building their manufacturing plants for TVs, they faced a choice: make big “cheap” flat panels that can’t go much below 42-inches (plasma), or build a more expensive factory that can make a wide variety of sizes, even though the bigger sizes will be more expensive (LCD). As production has increased, the larger LCD sizes have become more price competitive, so that distinction has disappeared. As such, you don’t see a lot of companies investing in new plasma TV manufacturing.”

LEDs versus LCDs

LEDs are an upgrade from LCD. They offer better picture quality in bright rooms, when compared to plasmas and LCDs. LEDs have an overall better color saturation balance, and they consume less power than plasmas and LCDs. Like LCDs, LED technology uses CCFL (Cold Cathode Fluorescent Lamps), but LED supersedes this technology when compared with LEDs.

Screen Size

Is bigger always better? In terms of televisions, it is possible to go too big and cause picture distortion. It’s best to choose a television that is comparable to your room size. According to HDTV for Dummies, the following display sizes are recommended for the following viewing distances:

5 feet or less: 27 inches

6 feet 9 inches: 30 inches

8 feet: 35 inches

9 feet: 40 inches

9 feet 9 inches: 42 inches

10 feet: 45 inches

10 feet 5 inches: 50 inches

12 feet 6 inches: 55 inches

13 feet 9 inches: 60 inches

15 feet: 65 inches

Programming Matters

What you watch is relative to what television is going to best meet your needs. For example, if you’re not a big television watcher, and will only be tuning into the nightly news or a sitcom here and there, you don’t need a lot of bells and whistles.

If you’re an avid television watcher and you love high-definition movies (most modern movies are HD), you’re going to need a better quality television. You’ll also want to choose a cable provider such as Direct TV on demand, which offers plenty of high-quality/high-definition movies and television programs.

Consider Your Budget

The final thing to consider is your budget. You know what you need, and there are a lot of brands vying for your business. Don’t overspend. Take your time, and seek out a television within your price range.

It may be beneficial to shop during sale times, such as the Memorial Day weekend sales or Fourth of July weekend sales. Black Friday is another great time to find HDTV deals.

IMG Credit: major_clanger, Flickr